Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.18419/opus-13775
Authors: Markthaler, Daniel
Birke, Kai Peter
Title: Analytic free-energy expression for the 2D-Ising model and perspectives for battery modeling
Issue Date: 2023
metadata.ubs.publikation.typ: Zeitschriftenartikel
metadata.ubs.publikation.seiten: 29
metadata.ubs.publikation.source: Batteries 9 (2023), No. 489
URI: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:93-opus-ds-137942
http://elib.uni-stuttgart.de/handle/11682/13794
http://dx.doi.org/10.18419/opus-13775
ISSN: 2313-0105
Abstract: Although originally developed to describe the magnetic behavior of matter, the Ising model represents one of the most widely used physical models, with applications in almost all scientific areas. Even after 100 years, the model still poses challenges and is the subject of active research. In this work, we address the question of whether it is possible to describe the free energy A of a finite-size 2D-Ising model of arbitrary size, based on a couple of analytically solvable 1D-Ising chains. The presented novel approach is based on rigorous statistical-thermodynamic principles and involves modeling the free energy contribution of an added inter-chain bond DAbond(b, N) as function of inverse temperature b and lattice size N. The identified simple analytic expression for DAbond is fitted to exact results of a series of finite-size quadratic N N-systems and enables straightforward and instantaneous calculation of thermodynamic quantities of interest, such as free energy and heat capacity for systems of an arbitrary size. This approach is not only interesting from a fundamental perspective with respect to the possible transfer to a 3D-Ising model, but also from an application-driven viewpoint in the context of (Li-ion) batteries where it could be applied to describe intercalation mechanisms.
Appears in Collections:05 Fakultät Informatik, Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik

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