Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.18419/opus-14373
Authors: Zerbian, Sabine
Zuban, Yulia
Klotz, Martin
Title: Intonational features of spontaneous narrations in monolingual and heritage Russian in the U.S. : an exploration of the RUEG corpus
Issue Date: 2023
metadata.ubs.publikation.typ: Zeitschriftenartikel
metadata.ubs.publikation.seiten: 24
metadata.ubs.publikation.source: Languages 9 (2024), No. 2
URI: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:93-opus-ds-143928
http://elib.uni-stuttgart.de/handle/11682/14392
http://dx.doi.org/10.18419/opus-14373
ISSN: 2226-471X
Abstract: This article presents RuPro, a new corpus resource of prosodically annotated speech by Russian heritage speakers in the U.S. and monolingually raised Russian speakers. The corpus contains data elicited in formal and informal communicative situations, by male/female and adolescent/adult speakers. The resource is presented with its architecture and annotation, and it is shown how it is used for the analysis of intonational features of spontaneous mono- and bilingual Russian speech. The analyses investigate the length of intonation phrases, types and number of pitch accents, and boundary tones. It emerges that the speaker groups do not differ in the inventory of pitch accents and boundary tones or in the relative frequency of these tonal events. However, they do differ in the length of intonation phrases (IPs), with heritage speakers showing shorter IPs also in the informal communicative situation. Both groups also differ concerning the number of pitch accents used on content words, with heritage speakers using more pitch accents than monolingually raised speakers. The results are discussed with respect to register differentiation and differences in prosodic density across both speaker groups.
Appears in Collections:09 Philosophisch-historische Fakultät

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